New Hampshire Working Families Deal So-Called “Right-to-Work” Legislation Its First Blow

New Hampshire Working Families Deal So-Called “Right-to-Work” 
Legislation Its First Blow In House Labor Committee Vote
 
 
Today, New Hampshire working families from across the Granite State stood together to protect workers from legislation that would have lowered their wages and exposed them to more dangerous work environments. The New Hampshire AFL-CIO would like to thank the 14 (ITL: 14/OTP: 7) members of the Committee that voted to defeat both the House and Senate versions of this deceptive “Right-to-Work” Legislation. Your support is not only appreciated but essential to defending our state against this anti-worker legislation.
 
 

Following today’s public hearing in the New Hampshire House of Representatives’ Labor Committee, New Hampshire labor leaders spoke out on the ant-worker legislation.

Glenn Brackett, President of the New Hampshire AFL-CIO: “The New Hampshire AFL-CIO was proud to stand with hundreds of working people across the state who are fighting to protect their rights at work. This legislation is an attack on working families by out-of-state special interests seeking to lower wages for everyone and undermine worker protections. The proponents of this legislation are playing politics with the future of our workforce, and New Hampshire working families deserve better.”

Richard Gulla, President of SEA/SEIU Local Union 1984: “So-called right to work has no place in the Granite State, and I’m proud we were able to pack this hall today with those who agree. Both of these bills are tired, recycled legislation that does nothing for the real problems facing our state. We need the House to reject these bills so we can get down to working together on legislation that helps – not hurts – New Hampshire families.”

Sarah Hirsch, President of the University of New Hampshire Lecturers Union: “The families of New Hampshire want the college students to be solidly prepared and ready to enter good careers. To do this, the faculty who teach and mentor them need to be protected, have job stability and security, good benefits, and a say in their working conditions!  Weakening unions ultimately weakens higher education, undercutting the development of a skilled workforce for New Hampshire at a time when we need more competitive workers in the state.”  

Frank Moroney, Executive Director AFSCME Council 93: “It’s a powerful statement that a majority of legislators, both Democrats and Republicans, voted against so-called “Right to Work” today. They stood together because they know protecting our right to speak up together on the job shouldn’t be a partisan issue. Right to Work would hurt working families across the Granite State, and we’ll continue to fight against this legislation as it moves to the House floor.”

Dennis Caza, President of Teamsters Local Union 633: “Today, hundreds of our brothers and sisters stood in Solidarity to defend the rights of New Hampshire’s workers. We hope that we have sent a message to the legislature that so-called “Right-to-Work” is not the solution that New Hampshire working families need. In the coming days, we urge workers in every industry across the state to contact their legislators and let them know that this so-called “Right-to-Work” legislation is wrong for New Hampshire.”

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Op-Ed: Air Traffic Control Privatization Would Hurt New Hampshire’s Working Families

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Air Traffic Control Privatization Would Hurt New Hampshire’s Working Families

Recently, there has been a push by some members of Congress to turn much of the air traffic control system (ATC) over to an independently owned corporation funded by user fees. This type of large scale privatization of the public airspace would eliminate responsible oversight, put good paying jobs in jeopardy and break up the ATC system as we know it.

Privatization of our air traffic control system is bad for workers in our state and will hurt New Hampshire’s economy. Control of the skies, which has traditionally been governed by public policy, will be placed in the hands of people more care more about revenue than safety and access.

Time and again we have seen that privatizing entire sectors of our economy leads to increased costs and lost jobs. Now more than ever, we should be protecting jobs and vital systems like the ATC from privatization.

New Hampshire’s airport system helps working families by creating jobs that fuel our state and local economies, while generating millions of dollars in state tax revenue. In addition to economic impact, aviation services such as medical evacuation, search and rescue operations, law enforcement flights, military exercises, and flight training all contribute directly to the quality of life of those who live and work in the state.

In a state like New Hampshire, where 40% of residents live in rural areas, and 66 percent live in places with population of less than 10,000 people, any threat to the viability of general aviation services that businesses or municipalities rely on is serious and will have a ripple effect on throughout the state.

Indirectly, these airports are also crucial to the continued vitality of aerospace, aircraft manufacturing, educational institutions and aviation organizations in the state. It is estimated that 8.8 out of every 1,000 workers in New Hampshire are employed in the aerospace and aviation industry. Privatizing air traffic control will increase user fees, decrease access and put a rural state like New Hampshire at the bottom of the list of priorities.

In addition, the FAA maintains a large, diverse workforce of over 1,700 employees throughout New England that includes air traffic control specialists, engineers, safety inspectors and administrative support staff among others. Privatization plans will jeopardize their benefits and significantly weaken their labor rights such as collective bargaining and whistle blower protections. Future pay, healthcare and retirement benefits will no longer have the underpinnings of federal law, which applies to FAA employees today.

New Hampshire’s air transportation system drives the flow of commerce, tourists, and visitors to and from our state, and it is working families that reap the benefit in the form of basic services, better wages and a stronger economy.

As the debate of privatization continues, and its impact on general aviation, airports and airlines is evaluated, it is important to keep in mind that the hardworking families of New Hampshire will be the ones who are most negatively impacted, should privatization be enacted. That alone should be reason enough to oppose any privatization proposals.

Dave Laughton

Secretary-Treasurer, Granite State Teamsters Local 633 53

Goffstown Rd

Manchester, NH 03102 603-625-9731

laughton@teamsters633.com 

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters is the only union that represents every craft of workers in the airline industry. IBT contracts now cover 80,000 airline industry workers, including mechanics, customer service and ramp agents, stock clerks, dispatch personnel, flight attendants, and pilots nationwide.

Teamsters Local 633 was chartered in 1934. Since that time they have grown to over 4,700 members working in New Hampshire for several different employers. 

Sources:

  1. http://www.nh.gov/dot/org/aerorailtransit/aeronautics/documents/Chapter9-EconomicContribution.pdf
  2. http://nata.aero/data/files/gia/stateadvocacy/governorsproclamationofgaappreciationmonth2014.pdf
  3. https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/arc/ro_center/media/ane_brochure.pdf 

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in the above piece are those solely of the author, and not the opinion of the New Hampshire AFL-CIO.

 

 

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